Posts Tagged ‘Roger Clyne and the Peacemakers’

This week in GO! Magazine’s music section

Friday, May 13th, 2011

It’s been a long time coming, but Empty Space Orchestra’s new album is here, and that means the local instrumental rock band has a CD-release show on Thursday. I caught up with ESO last week and we talked about their popularity in Bend and taking their show to new towns.

“I don’t really feel like I want it to happen faster,” guitarist Shane Thomas said. “I mean, it would be nice if it would, but we know we’ll have to go to other cities and play for, like, 15 and 20 people. That’s nothing that’s old for us, but it’s definitely nice to be able to come back here and play for (big crowds).”

Saxophonist Graham Jacobs said the band is “pretty excited” to play new towns, a point drummer Lindsey Elias reiterated after acknowledging that well-attended Bend shows are always a boost.

“But it’s also nice to really get in front of the few people that are there in those different cities that have … virgin ears,” she said. “That’s what’s fun, to see people’s reactions to something they’ve never seen before.”

Click here to read the whole thing, won’t you?

(There is another video of Ozomatli performing in Bend on Frequency’s YouTube channel.)

Like most of Bend — OK, not most, but a lot of people — Feedback got swept up in last week’s Cinco de Mayo celebration in downtown Bend. I loved Rubblebucket’s music, missed Todd Haaby, and was wowed by the crowd for the headliner, Ozomatli.

It was a sea of party-hungry humanity: beers aloft, kids on shoulders, smiling faces, sombreros flying through the air and folks finding whatever space they could to dance to the sounds of Ozomatli, the L.A.-based Latin fusion band that headlined the night and charged through a set of fiery songs that only fueled the celebration.

Ozomatli has become world famous for its versatility, and they showcased it in Bend, bouncing easily from hip-hop to cumbia to funk to reggae to straight-up punk rock, reflecting the cosmopolitan sprawl of their hometown. Highlights included the stomping rap-rock of “City of Angels,” an epic, brassy ranchera tune called “Caballito” and “La Temperatura,” a heavily Latin-flavored number that inspired chaos among the crowd.

I hope you’ll read the whole thing by clicking here.

Elsewhere in the music section: Tyler Fortier brings his excellent songs to the Silver Moon, Roger Clyne & The Peacemakers return to town, members of the Hieroglyphics crew headline a hip-hop show and The Bobby Lindstrom band and Sisters Americana Project celebrate new CDs, plus Cicada Omega, Will West and Mumbo Gumbo, and a Last Band Standing update.

This week in GO! Magazine’s music section

Friday, November 5th, 2010

Built to Spill is coming to Bend on Wednesday! Very exciting. I rambled on a bit on the band’s amazing three-album run in the late 1990s.

… from 1994 to 1999, Boise, Idaho’s Built to Spill — formed nearly two decades ago by Doug Martsch, torchbearer for the Northwest music scene — put together a magical three-album run with “There’s Nothing Wrong With Love,” “Perfect From Now On” and “Keep It Like A Secret.” Each is wonderful in its own way; “Love” spills over with compact, punchy pop songs, “Perfect” sprawls like prog-rock updated for the 21st century, and “Secret” is a splendid marriage of the two, 10 tracks of dreamy, delightful pop-rock bliss.

The common thread is Martsch’s distinctive style: psychedelic guitar heroism more associated with ’70s jams than ’90s indie rock and a lullaby voice that scales Neil Young’s helium-heights, backed by a band with a no-nonsense approach to playing. Built to Spill doesn’t trade in showy stage goofs to draw you in. No, they came to rock, ever so gently, and then build up to a melt-your-face crescendo, and that’s exactly what they’re going to do.

Click here to read the whole thing.

(Someone called WoodyDee got the above footage of Billy Bragg soundchecking before his show in Bend. Very cool.)

I went and saw Billy Bragg at the Tower Theatre on election night and enjoyed myself quite a bit. The guy is nothing if not entertaining. Here’s an excerpt of my review:

… I was most struck by Bragg’s strong, distinctive voice, and his way with melody. At best, I’m a casual fan of the man’s recorded work, so many of the songs were new to me. But all were tied together by an easygoing charm that belied whatever their lyrical theme happened to be, whether it was Japanese-American internment during World War II, the power of a union, or the “misanthropic, misbegotten merchants of gloom.” Or, you know … a pretty girl.

Bragg was subdued and soulful on “Farm Boy,” and “Shirley” was a fun little slice of sunny pop. He did a few Woody Guthrie numbers, showed off his guitar skills on “The Milkman of Human Kindness,” and provided the prettiest moment of the night through the entrancing, arpeggiated chords of “Tank Park Salute.”

I hope you’ll read the whole thing by clicking here.

Also in this week’s music section: Arizona rockers Roger Clyne and the Peacemakers visit Silver Moon Brewing, and so does Brooklyn-based indie-folksinger Kelli Scarr. Plus the Chicago Afrobeat Project, Kites & Crows, Bryon Friedman, a tribute to Simon & Garfunkel, and a rockin’ weekend at MadHappy Lounge with Tony Smiley on Friday and The New Up on Saturday.