Posts Tagged ‘Jones Road’

This week in GO! Magazine’s music section

Friday, April 22nd, 2011

Canadian bass music producer ill.Gates will headline tonight’s “For the Music” party to celebrate Slipmat Science’s ninth anniversary. I spoke with the man about how and why he immersed himself in the world of electronic composition.

Two decades ago, Lane was that upstart kid. He played guitar and piano, but got his first sampler at age 7, went to his first rave at 13, and liked the wide-open horizons of electronic music.

“It just sounded so new and different and fresh,” he said. “At that point, I had learned guitar, but I just felt like guitar music didn’t really need me. I felt like what I was doing was just kind of a commentary on the history of guitar music.

“I got a sampler and thought, ‘These instruments are new. These … have a lot of history left to unfold. This is something I can be a part of,’” Lane said. “I felt (guitars) had been so explored that I was going to have to really struggle to find something new, and I just didn’t want to sound like anyone else. I wanted to do something entirely different. I wanted to have my own thing.”

I also talked to one of the guys behind Slipmat to get the skinny on that crew’s origins. Click here to read them both. (The Slipmat story is on the right, in smaller print.)

Gregory Alan Isakov. Photo by Ben.

Feedback this week is on last Saturday’s wonderful Gregory Alan Isakov concert at the PoetHouse in downtown Bend. What a night. Here’s an excerpt.

Isakov’s set was a blend of old (the downcast “The Stable Song,” the throwback jazz of “Salt and the Sea”) and brand new (he said he’s working on his next album now), plus a stark cover of John Hartford’s “In Tall Buildings.”

Then there was plenty from Isakov’s wonderful 2009 album “This Empty Northern Hemisphere.” The Ryan Adams-esque sway of “That Moon Song” got the biggest response of the night, “Virginia May” rode a likable shuffle, and “Evelyn” gave Isakov’s crack band — drums, keys, cello and violin — a chance to rock out in their own gentle, orchestral style.

The highlight of the night, though, came mid-set when Isakov did a warm, resonant and drop-dead gorgeous song about the universe’s beauty and bruised feet, and then followed it with the title track from “This Empty Northern Hemisphere,” which crescendoed into a swarm of strings and falsetto oohs and ahhs. Isakov’s band has a firm grip on the power of dynamics, and those two songs showcased every inch of their range.

I hope you’ll read the whole thing by clicking here.

Elsewhere in this week’s music section: David Jacobs-Strain’s rootsy blues, Noise-A-Tron’s dark, heavy rock, McMenamins’ ’80s-themed “prom” and the Blues, Amuse & Brews benefit for Westside Village school. Plus there are a bunch of local acts with good gigs this week, including The Prairie Rockets, OpenFate, Jones Road, Kylan Johnson, Clair Clarke, JazzBros, Concave Perception Chamber and the Brian Hanson Band.

This week in GO! Magazine’s music section

Friday, March 11th, 2011

San Francisco pop-rock band The Mother Hips will play McMenamins Old St. Francis School on St. Patrick’s Day. I called up band co-founder Tim Bluhm and asked him why so many people think the Hips are a jam band.

“It used to make us so angry when people called us (that),” said Bluhm, 40, in a telephone interview from his home in San Francisco last month. “It actually sort of crippled us in some ways because if we would’ve just accepted that label we probably would’ve made some inroads into that world … but we were too stubborn and too concerned about our image.

“We really didn’t like that. It curdled our blood,” Bluhm said. “But that was a long time ago and now we’re older and we realize that stuff is for other people to worry about. We don’t care what anyone calls it.”

Why so many people who haven’t heard the Hips believe they fall into the “jam band” category (think Widespread Panic, Phish, etc.) is a bit of a mystery. Sure, the band’s name evokes visions of twirl dancing to an endless guitar solo. And sure, the band played the jam-friendly H.O.R.D.E. tour, like, forever ago. But for the most part, Bluhm and his mates have been crunchy pop-rockers from the start.

“I mean, we had long hair,” Bluhm said, “but so did Black Sabbath.”

I hope you’ll click here to read the whole thing.

Also this week, we have not one but two local artists holding CD-release shows. Sisters Americana Project product Laura Curtis will celebrate “Loving a Ghost” at The Barn in Sisters, while Bend-based alt-rock band Jones Road will spread their party for “The Whipping Boy” over two nights at the Northside Bar.

Elsewhere in this week’s music section: Franchot Tone warms up Velvet, Bex (as in Shannon Bex) plays the Domino Room, Great Big Sea rolls into the Tower Theatre, Sunny Ledfurd returns to town, Jerry Joseph brings The Jackmormons to Silver Moon, and The David Mayfield Parade is at McMenamins. Plus, Jim Jam honors departed music lovers, Mountain Country Idol’s finals are this weekend in Redmond, and a renowned jazz duo will perform on Sunday morning at Cascade School of Music.

December 11 in GO! Magazine

Friday, December 11th, 2009

Baby it’s cold outside! So warm up your bones by checking out some live music this week. Here’s what’s happening:

-Local rootsy chanteuse (roots-teuse?) Erin Cole-Baker has a brand new CD ready to go and she’ll celebrate it with a concert Saturday evening in Bend. Here’s the title track from that album, “Talon and Spur,” for your downloading pleasure:

Download Erin Cole-Baker, “Talon and Spur”

-Things will be buzzing Saturday night at the Midtown music complex, where pop-rocker Bob Schneider will perform upstairs in The Annex while Sublime tribute band 40 Oz. to Freedom plays downstairs in the Domino Room.

-Welcome to the sports section: If you’re a snowrider, you might be checking out the rail jam at Skjersaa’s tonight. If so, head to Players Bar afterward for the official after-party, with music by Tuck and Roll and The Extorted. If you’re a cyclist, may we interest you in the Cross Nat’s Blowout Bash? It’s happening tonight at Midtown Ballroom, with performances by The Sprockettes, Mosley Wotta and The Dirty Words.

-Two mighty fine bands are playing at Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom tonight: The Physical Hearts and Celilo. If you like gentle, twangy indie-pop, you should be at this show. The Physical Hearts were nice enough to send over a song for you to download, too:

Download The Physical Hearts, “Fend Off the Tide”

-Also in the section this week: Blackflowers Blacksun is back from Alaska and playing at M&J Tavern, Shireen Amini and her full band will light up Silver Moon on Wednesday, Jones Road plays the first installment of “Metal Mondays” at Black Horse Saloon, and The Commercial Underground guitarist Andrew Cooper will show off his solo side tonight at WineStyles.

If you’re not a subscriber to The Bulletin’s Web site, you’ll run into problems with those links above. So pick up today’s paper to read it all and to check out the cool bike-related artwork on the cover of GO! Magazine (and the article on the bike-related artwork inside).

And stay warm.

Music-y articles not in GO! Magazine

Monday, December 7th, 2009

In the past few days, The Bulletin has published a few articles outside GO! Magazine that are focused on music. Check ‘em out:

-Young local rockers The Tree Dwellers have advanced to the semi-finals of a nation-wide, online battle of the bands. Around 100 bands entered, the field was narrowed to 24, and now it’s down to eight. My colleague Hillary Borrud met up with the guys yesterday and wrote all about them here, and you can go vote for them in the contest here. Voting is open for a week.

-Did you know there have been two local bands called Jones Road? One played around Bend in the mid-1970s and the other is up and running right now. They both got started within a few hundred feet of each other, but 30+ years apart. And the new Jones Road picked its name with no knowledge of its predecessor. Old-timers should definitely give this article a read, if nothing else for the recollections of places like The Family Tree, The Palace and the Hollinshead ranch.

-Thanks to the popularity of games like Rock Band and Guitar Hero, Bend’s Breedlove Guitar Co. is planning to expand. Editorial note: I played Rock Band for the second time ever last night and it is the most fun ever.