Posts Tagged ‘Five Pint Mary’

This week in GO! Magazine’s music section

Friday, February 24th, 2012

Everywhere you look these days, it’s Bobby Lindstrom, Bobby Lindstrom, Bobby Lindstrom.

The Bend-based blues/rock singer-songwriter seems to get more gigs ’round here than just about anyone else.

So we decided to write about him!

This week, Bobby’s playing four shows in five nights. My colleague David Jasper met up with him earlier this week and found about his background and the clarity that comes with being clean and sober.

When he was 17, (Lindstrom) and a friend attended a recording seminar at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, and decided to hitchhike from there to Oxnard, Calif. “His cousin lived there, and he wasn’t home. We sat out on his porch, and I started playing the blues, just like that,” Lindstrom said. “I’m like, ‘Dude! Check this out! This is so easy, man.’ After that I started listening to B.B. King, Jimmy Reed, Taj Mahal, Little Richard.”

He’s been writing and playing the blues ever since. The hale, 58-year-old father of a 31-year-old son, Lindstrom describes himself as a recovering addict. He’s had a rebellious tendency and an addictive personality from childhood — “long before I found drugs,” he said — and has been clean and sober since 1995.

Following rehab, Lindstrom launched into a flurry of writing and recording, and has released a string of six albums since 1999. His most recent two are 2010’s “Hungry, Cold & Blue” and “Bring It On,” released last year. A disc of blues standards is slated for release this year. (Lindstrom’s albums are available at www.reverbnation.com/bobbylindstrom.)

“It’s been curious watching myself, as I learn to write and play and start to get some success. Success is the strangest thing for a recovering addict. All of a sudden, everything is working,” he said. “The last couple of years, everything that I’ve been through is starting to make sense. It’s starting to come into focus.”

I hope you’ll click here and read the whole thing.

Boots Riley and The Coup

For my Feedback column this week, I spent Saturday night taking in some hip-hop: The Coup, Busdriver and Buck 65 at Bend WinterFest. Here’s an excerpt:

To paraphrase that great, graceful star of stage and screen known as Meat Loaf, I would do anything for a quality hip-hop show in Bend … even that.

And by “that” I mean “traipse around Bend’s west side on a bone-chilling February night to see three interesting and imaginative rappers perform in a town that has experienced a dearth of good hip-hop in recent months.”

Even that, I would do.

Let’s get this out of the way: Saturday night was cold. So, so cold. Cold enough that my brilliant plan to park at the Century Center, walk a mile or so to Bend WinterFest to see Oakland-based funk-hop group The Coup on an outdoor stage in the Old Mill District, and then walk back to the Century Center for an indoor afterparty show by oddball rappers Busdriver and Buck 65 didn’t seem so brilliant at about 9:45 p.m., as I trudged along Simpson Avenue, teeth chattering.

What can I say? I don’t look at weather forecasts.

I promise the whole thing isn’t about me. In fact, the rest is about the shows. Read the whole thing by clicking here.

Also in this week’s music section: G. Love & Special Sauce return to the Domino Room, Greensky Bluegrass is back in town tonight, and a ton of locals: Five Pint Mary, Rural Demons, Blackflowers Blacksun, Johnny Forrest, Boxcar Stringband, Flannel Bandana. Plus we’ve got a photo album of Third Seven’s tour of Europe right here. He’ll play a homecoming show Monday.

This week in GO! Magazine’s music section

Friday, December 30th, 2011

New Year’s Eve + a Saturday night = party time

That’s the situation this weekend as one of the year’s most festive holidays coincides with the most party-friendly night of the week, and I suspect the result will be a very crowded and crazy bunch of New Year’s Eve events around Central Oregon.

Fortunately, there are a ton to choose from, so that may help thin crowds a little bit. Click here for our main New Year’s story detailing many of the biggest options in the area, and click here for our comprehensive listing of everything happening on Saturday night.

Now for non-New Year’s stuff!

Local Celtic-rock band Five Pint Mary will celebrate its new album with a show tonight at M&J Tavern. I spoke with co-founder Michael Holmes about the group’s connection with its fans.

“A lot of these old songs were really meant to tell the history of a battle or something, so they’ve been repeated for centuries and they just kind of take on a life of their own,” Holmes said. “People have been singing along with them for hundreds of years, and a lot of people have heard these songs since they were little kids. So we have people who come to our shows and they’re singing the lyrics right back to us. Which is really the intent of a lot of the songs.”

He continued: “In the days before jukeboxes and recorded music, you went to the pub and you sang along with the band. It was just something that you did, and that’s really still happening today. And when you go to a show like that … it’s like you can’t sit still. It’s more like something you’re actually doing rather than something you’re sitting there listening to.”

As just about any musician will tell you, that’s what it’s all about: connection with the audience.

“Whenever people ask us for a request, it really makes us feel good because a lot of the songs … (are) near and dear to their hearts for whatever reason,” Holmes said. “It’s like this person’s favorite song since they were a kid, so it feels good.”

I hope you’ll click here and read the whole thing.

Elsewhere in this week’s music section: Washington-based dark-folk band Terrible Buttons stops at The Horned Hand on Sunday night. Click here to read my colleague David Jasper’s interview with head Button Kent Ueland. Also, Bay Area hip-hop/reggae dude RasCue returns to town, Hopeless Jack & The Handsome Devil brings dirty blues to Bend, and some news from the Sisters Folk Festival, including discounted passes for 2012 and the lineup for the upcoming winter concert series.

Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day in style with Five Pint Mary

Thursday, March 17th, 2011

The smiling faces of Five Pint Mary.

There are lots of options for going out tonight to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day. But if it’s a genuine Celtic sound you’re looking for, you’re not going to do much better than catching Five Pint Mary and the Bend Fire Pipes and Drums Band at the Domino Room.

In Bend, bands like Flogging Molly, Young Dubliners and the Clumsy Lovers do just fine, thank you very much, drawing good crowds every time they roll through town. So if you’re jonesing for some of that Celtic-meets-punk-rock sound — or if you love The Pogues, as you should — you definitely want to hit the Domino Room tonight. The show will start at 7:30 p.m., and it costs $5 to get in unless you’re a member in good standing of the Harp Hall group that’s throwing the party.

Here’s some tasty Five Pint Mary action to help you pass the time at work and get you in the spirit for tonight.

This week in GO! Magazine’s music section

Friday, January 14th, 2011

The Oxford Hotel in downtown Bend will kick off its new jazz series this weekend with three performances by the Mel Brown Quartet. I spoke with the band’s namesake drummer about the MBQ, one of three bands he plays in at Jimmy Mak’s jazz club in Portland’s Pearl District.

The MBQ came together years ago to play tight, hard-swinging bop in a style somewhat similar to that of one of Brown’s heros, Art Blakey and his Jazz Messengers. The group has been described as a quartet of bandleaders, though Pacini is the official music director, leading the MBQ through its vast repertoire of originals and standards “with a different twist,” Brown said.

“(The band) is kind of like my background — the way I was raised, the music I grew up on,” Brown said. “We play straight ahead, and it feels really good. Everybody plays and we listen to each other a lot.

“Plus everybody likes each other,” he continued. “In most bands you get something good going and all of a sudden there’s an internal fight, and that’s because you’re around each other too much. I see some of these guys once a week, so we don’t have time to get mad. Hell, we’re just happy to be playing.”

Brown is a legend in the Northwest jazz scene, and you should click here to read the whole interview. While you’re there, read up on the other jazz happenings this weekend, including a Just Joe’s show at Greenwood Playhouse, and Cascade School of Music’s effort to revive the old Sunday shows at Be Bop Coffee House.

Champagne Champagne's Pearl Dragon performs in the rafters of the Old Mill Music Lounge. Photo by Ben.

This week’s Feedback column focuses on two Seattle hip-hop groups — Champagne Champagne and Mad Rad — that performed last weekend at the Old Mill Music Lounge. There’s weren’t many people there, so chances are decent you weren’t there, so read on …

As is frequently the case in this genre, Champagne Champagne’s DJ (Mark Gajadhar) is a secret, shadowy weapon. As is less frequently the case, he may be their MVP. (MCs Sir Thomas) Gray and Pearl Dragon were solid, engaging performers all night; Gray manned a mic stand like a rock singer, and his partner stalked off the stage more than once to rap from within the crowd. They slayed their best song (so far), “Soda & Pop Rocks,” with its wicked, dubstep-y bass line and shoutouts to the streets of Seattle: “My city’s not pretty it’s gritty,” Pearl Dragon raps. “Top notch when the block’s hot, blow up like soda and pop rocks.”

Elsewhere, the MCs showcased their influences: indie/alt-rock (one tune referenced Sonic Youth’s “Bull in the Heather”) and ’80s-child pop culture (“She looks like Molly Ringwald. She’s beautiful to me.”), while Gajadhar rocked like an octopus working overtime, bouncing from electric guitar to keyboard to tambourine to drum machine to melodica and back. His work was sometimes ominous and murky (“Something Strange”), sometimes bright and poppy (“Hollywood Shampoo” sounds like hip-hop built on a Shins song), and sometimes a sweet and sour collision of video-game bloops and punk-rock squall.

It was a great show. I hope you’ll read the whole thing by clicking here.

Elsewhere in this week’s music section: Larry and His Flask headline a show to benefit two of its members’ dad, Tribal Seeds and Anthony B (separately) bring reggae to the Domino Room, Rootdown rocks McMenamins, Empty Space Orchestra continues its January residency at Silver Moon, Seattle folkie Sarah Sample plays Sisters, MC Mystic spins Michael Jackson tunes at MadHappy Lounge and local bands Five Pint Mary and Boxcar Stringband play a benefit for BAKESTARR.

This week in GO! Magazine’s music section

Friday, August 6th, 2010

If you haven’t heard his name, at least take a few minutes to listen to William Fitzsimmons’ music. The guy writes beautifully downcast songs in the same vein as Sufjan Stevens and Iron & Wine’s Sam Beam. I talked to Fitzsimmons earlier this week about his current state of mind after going through some dark times. Here’s an excerpt:

Last year, Fitzsimmons told National Public Radio he was looking forward to writing new material and moving on from that dark place in his life. Earlier this week … he said he’s currently working on songs for a new album, which he hopes to release next year.

As you might expect, the process has been refreshing.

“It’s a little different. It’s nice, because I’m in a different place in my life than I was a few years ago, fortunately,” Fitzsimmons said. “Things aren’t quite as dark or as morbid, so writing the songs … I don’t want to say it was fun, but it sure as hell was a lot more fun than it was before.”

Fitzsimmons has been unveiling those new songs at shows over the past month. He describes them not as happy, but hopeful.

“I decided I kind of wanted to write about things that were more in the line of healing and restoration, sort of the polar opposite of what I was writing about before,” he said. “So instead of things being destroyed, it was (about) things being mended and fixed and put back together. It feels good but it also feels right. It feels like it’s where my head has been.”

I hope you’ll click here to read the whole thing.

Elsewhere in this week’s music section, you’ll find short stories on the fine, fuzz-pop band The Parson Red Heads at McMenamins Old St. Francis School, the three-day jazzstravaganza that is Jade’s Jazz Festival in La Pine, and the Southern jam band Dangermuffin, who win the “hard worker” award for playing four shows in town over the next six days.

Plus: David Bromberg, Jena Rickards’ CD-release show, Emma Hill and Her Gentlemen Callers, David Jacobs-Strain, Five Pint Mary and the Bend Fire Pipe and Drum Band, and an early heads-up on High Street playing a show to benefit Sisters schools. Want more options? Check out The Bulletin’s complete music listing.