Posts Tagged ‘Central Oregon Songwriters Association’

This week in GO! Magazine’s music section

Friday, May 3rd, 2013

Here’s your weekly roundup of what’s in today’s section!

Eilen Jewell is an Idahoan, a former Bostonian, a spitfire and an ultra-cool roots-rocker. (She is not, however, an Eileen.) Jewell returns to Sisters Wednesday, and my colleague David Jasper caught up with her and talked about what folks can expect at The Belfry.

“Our live show is a mix of songs from various albums. I don’t tend to stick to just one album, it’s not just the latest one,” she said. “There’s usually some from every one that we’ve released so far, including side projects like the Sacred Shakers. Usually we’ll throw in a Loretta Lynn song (or two). And Jerry Miller, the lead guitarist in my band, has a solo project out, and we’ll do one or two from his brand new record.

“We give every show our all,” Jewell said. “We’re real excited to get back out West.”

I hope you’ll read the whole thing.

Aesop Rock performs last weekend in Bend. Photo by Joe Kline / The Bulletin.

Aesop Rock performs last weekend in Bend. Photo by Joe Kline / The Bulletin.

In Feedback, I reviewed last weekend’s Aesop Rock show at the Domino Room in Bend. It was good, but Aes spent a lot of time sharing the spotlight with his buddies. I would’ve liked a little more of the headliner doing his own solo stuff.

He delivered, eventually, ripping through “Skelethon” singles “ZZZ Top,” “Cycles To Gehenna” (with its wonderful third act set to stark, somber piano) and “Zero Dark Thirty.” The latter’s roller-coaster melody and skittish beat stood out among the bass-drenched rumbles that overwhelmed other songs’ subtleties.

In the end, Aes gave the people what they want, doing fan-fave oldies “Nightlight” and “Daylight” and then reaching way back for “No Regrets” from his classic 2001 album “Labor Days.”

It all sounded good. The performers performed well. I enjoyed myself, truly. And the medium-sized crowd seemed to do the same.

I just walked out of the Domino Room feeling like I’d bought a ticket to an Aesop Rock show but ended up seeing a stop on the Aesop Rock & Friends Present The Traveling Rhymesayers Revue Tour.

Click here to read the whole review.

Elsewhere in the music section: Week of Wonders headlines a garage-y bill at The Horned Hand, The Black Lillies come to McMenamins, the Central Oregon Songwriters Association holds its annual Song of the Year awards show, The Northstar Session returns to The Sound Garden, Tracy Grammer plays The Belfry in Sisters and Danny Barnes will fill McMenamins with his banjotronics sound, plus a couple of good, local Cinco de Mayo options (Chiringa and Moon Mountain Ramblers) and a benefit concert featuring three local faves (Tony Smiley, MoWo and Keez).

This week in GO! Magazine’s music section

Friday, April 1st, 2011

Hip-hop legend Ice Cube rolls into Bend’s Midtown Ballroom on Wednesday! In this week’s GO! Magazine, I make the case for why you shouldn’t turn your nose up at a chance to see the man, given his enormous influence on rap music over the past 20 years.

After “The Predator” (plus his increasing interest in film work), Cube’s musical dominance waned, no doubt about it. But hindsight provides perspective on the importance of Ice Cube’s stint with N.W.A. and his first three solo albums, which, along with fellow gangsta rap pioneer and N.W.A. alum Dr. Dre, ushered in an era of hip-hop that valued gritty street tales and speaking truth to power over, say, a pair of glittery parachute pants. It was an era that would reign for nearly 15 years, until Kanye West came along and spawned a generation of emotive, Auto-Tune-happy singsong rappers like Drake and Kid Cudi.

These days, Ice Cube sounds like a man intent on securing his legacy. His 2010 album is called “I Am the West” and on the chorus of its lead single, “I Rep That West,” Cube defends himself against those who criticize his career arc and reminds us he’s a “hall of famer” in the rap game.

That’s understandable, but unnecessary. Ice Cube doesn’t need to apologize for being a fortysomething dude who has made a ton of cash in his lifetime and can no longer rap knowledgeably about life on the streets.

Sure, the game has passed him by. But it also owes him so much in terms of style, culture and history, thanks in large part to a hyper-productive, ultra-creative five-year stretch more than two decades ago. Even in 2011, the man deserves respect for that.

On the fence about buying a ticket? Click here to be convinced that you should.

Speaking of legends, yes, R.E.M. guitarist Peter Buck plays bass for The Baseball Project, and yes, the baseball-themed band is coming to Silver Moon on Thursday. But the Project is the brainchild of pop-rock lifers Scott McCaughey (Minus 5, Young Fresh Fellows) and Steve Wynn (Dream Syndicate, Miracle 3), two super-fans of our national pastime. I caught up with McCaughey shortly after the band wrapped up its tour of spring training sites in Arizona.

GO!: Because of the subject material, is The Baseball Project more fun than your other, non-baseball bands?

SM: I can’t say one’s more fun than the other because of course we love playing our other songs as well, but this is a whole different thing. In a way it’s sort of a relief … to write about another subject. Even though some of the songs end up being personal, a lot of them are also just sort of writing in the folk tradition, the oral tradition of recounting a story or reciting a ballad or whatever, which is a lot different from what Steve and I write normally. So it’s kind of refreshing. I like it. Sometimes I get so into it that it makes it hard to tune back into writing a song about my boring life or whatever.

I will say, though, (at the spring training gigs) I found myself really kind of getting lost in some of these songs … so I felt pretty good about that. They weren’t just exercises in cleverness or something like that. I think they have some emotional weight. At least it feels like it to me when I sing some of ‘em. We’ve been writing songs for so long that we have … a certain standard that we hold ourselves to. Just because these songs are about baseball doesn’t mean that they don’t have to be good songs.

Click here to read the whole thing.

Elsewhere in the music section, we have a fundraiser for Shireen Amini’s new album, tonight’s CD-release party to celebrate Jay Tablet’s “Put It On the Tab,” and the Central Oregon Songwriters’ Association’s annual Song of the Year show, plus The Dangerous Summer, Christabel & the Jons, Necktie Killer, The Mowbray Collective and MC Mystic doing ladies night right. There’s a lot going on in town this weekend, so be sure to check out The Bulletin’s calendar for more options!

This week in GO! Magazine’s music section

Friday, April 30th, 2010

Bend faves Head for the Hills return to town to play their biggest gig yet, a headlining slot at the Domino Room. My colleague Alandra Johnson talked to bassist Matt Loewen to find out how working with a very famous producer affected the band’s new, self-titled album.

The album also marked the first time the band worked with producer Drew Emmitt of Boulder jam band Leftover Salmon.

“He’s an incredible musician and a really great singer,” said Loewen.

The band also found Emmitt was skilled at helping them get the live feeling they all wanted to achieve on the new album.

Loewen said Emmitt had the ability to “hone in on that energy and sound.”

You really should read the whole thing right here.

Also in this week’s music section: the heavy, industrial rock of Powerman 5000 returns to Bend, local metal combo Kleverkill plays a CD-release show, California pop band Lakes headlines the Blues Amuse and Brews fundraiser, the new Jade’s Jazz Lounge celebrates its grand opening in La Pine, the Central Oregon Songwriters Association holds its annual Song of the Year show, and an update on the big Last Band Standing battle happening each Thursday at Boondocks. And you can always find much more in our complete music listings.