Posts Tagged ‘Aldrine Guerrero’

This week in GO! Magazine’s music section

Friday, October 19th, 2012

When we were discussing what to put on the cover of today’s GO! Magazine, I mentioned tonight’s Macklemore & Ryan Lewis show at Midtown Ballroom and told my coworkers this: We get a lot of has-beens and not-yets and never-will-bes in this town, but it’s not that often we have an artist come through at the very same moment that they’re the hottest story in music. Tonight is one of those times. Macklemore – aka Ben Haggerty from Seattle – is in his moment.

Tonight, Macklemore & Ryan Lewis will rock a sold-out Midtown Ballroom. I wrote about their current wave of success and their new album “The Heist,” but focused on the best, most important song on that album, “Same Love.” Here’s an excerpt.

In it, Haggerty tackles the topic head on, ignoring a long-held taboo in hip-hop. He lays out his own stereotypes about homosexuality, decries the casual use of “gay” as a synonym for “bad” in our culture, calls out his own genre for looking the other way and, along the way, weaves in commentary on politics and religion. Seattle vocalist Mary Lambert ably sings the beautiful hook: “I can’t change/ Even if I wanted to,” which is lifted from one of Lambert’s own songs.

Haggerty closes his third verse this way:

“I might not be the same
But that’s not important
No freedom till we’re equal
Damn right I support it.”

Whether or not you or I agree with Macklemore is not the point here, by the way. The point is to acknowledge the guy’s forever-place in a watershed summer for the heretofore odd couple of hip-hop and homosexuality.

I enjoyed writing this, and I hope you’ll read the whole thing.

Also tonight, the third Jazz at the Oxford series kicks off in Bend with a night of Portland blues. My colleague David Jasper spoke to iconic Oregon bluesman Curtis Salgado about his battles against cancer and how they’ve changed him as an artist.

“It’s scary because the older I get, the older I want to get. It’s scary because you don’t want to know how you’re going to die,” said Salgado, who saw his mother die of cancer. “Cancer is the ultimate predator. Cancer’s like a great white shark. It’s dangerous and fascinating at the same time.”

But, with no chemotherapy required, Salgado has been able to do what he’s done for decades: get back out on the road, this time in promotion of “Soul Shot,” his first all-soul album, which dropped April 10 on Alligator Records.

If there’s any plus to cancer, Salgado said, “It just fine tunes you into life, and what’s around you, and every moment. I used to want to fill a coliseum with people and win lots of Grammys and have a nice house on the McKenzie River, you know what I’m saying?”

Now, “I don’t care anymore,” he said. “I’m just very blessed to be here. I’m blessed to play my music with my friends, and play to people who are so nice to me. It’s like, look, man, I owe the universe.”

Read the whole thing and peruse the series’ 2012-13 schedule here.

Elsewhere in this week’s music section: Adventure Galley, The Autonomics, Black Pussy, Aldrine Guerrero, Matt Woods, Michael Dean Damron, The Rum and The Sea and more.

This week in GO! Magazine’s music section

Friday, October 7th, 2011

Portland soul-pop band Dirty Mittens are making the trek over to Bend for the first time for a show at McMenamins on Wednesday. I spoke with frontwoman Chelsea Morrisey about her band’s fine new album “Heart of Town” and making music in the 21st century. Here’s an excerpt:

“It’s a world where, when you have a good single, people want to hear it now,” Morrisey said. “They want to hear it on YouTube and everywhere. There’s no time to waste, really, because that song’s not going to be relevant (in a year).

“I can write a song this afternoon and have it up on Soundcloud in an hour,” she continued, “and it’s like people’s ability to do that just changes the way music sounds all the time. Trends are moving so much more quickly.”

One thing that’s not trendy, but timeless: A great live show. Dirty Mittens prioritize theirs, putting in hours to ensure folks who show up to a gig don’t walk away disappointed, because you never get a second chance to make a first impression.

“We’re in an era where people just don’t really focus enough energy on their live show anymore,” Morrisey said. “It’s so easy to get popular from an MP3 on (influential music website) Pitchfork, it’s like they don’t even need to because people are going to pay to see their show just to be seen.”

I hope you’ll click right here and read the whole thing.

A couple other things worth highlighting this week:
–Portland country band Cloverdayle features the vocals of Rachel Hamar, who grew up here and graduated from Bend High School in 1997. They’re playing Maverick’s Country Bar and Grill on Saturday. Read all about it right here.

–The second half of 2011 seems to have brought about a reggae resurgence in Central Oregon, including a show tonight by Richie Spice. Read about the reggae uprising and Spice by clicking here.

Elsewhere in this week’s music section: Polyrhythmics, Sonos, ukelele master Aldrine Guerrero, Riders in the Sky, Emma Hill, Strive Roots, and a couple of warm-up punk shows at Innovation Theatre before the big launch party next weekend.